Jennifer Giddiens, BSN, RN

  • Hello KES families. I am excited to be returning for another year with your students. This is my 4th year in school nursing, but I have been a nurse for approximately 10 years and have worked in different areas including the Emergency Department, Labor and Delivery, and Pre-Op/Post-Op.  I live in Buda with my husband and 5 children who are spread across multiple schools throughout Hays CISD. I am looking forward to a wonderful year with all of our students and families. 

    School nursing is a professional registered nursing specialty that involves identification, assessment, prevention, and intervention to remedy or modify students' health needs. The nurse's goal is to promote the optimum health of students and the students' abilities to achieve their individual educational goals.

    Nurses monitor required immunizations, perform mandated health screenings, track communicable diseases, plan for emergencies and provide direct care to students. Please use the links to the left to learn more about the Hays CISD District Health Services.

    We would like to assure you that medical information about your child is treated as confidential by the nurses and all school staff.  We do not share information about your child with outside parties nor can we discuss health concerns of any other student with you. 

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News from the Nurse

  • Dear KES Parent or Guardian:

    The peak of the cold and flu season is upon us. To prevent widespread flu in the school, we recommend that your child stay home from school if they experience flu or cold symptoms. To decide whether or not to send your child to school, please consider the following guidelines:

    Consider keeping your child at home for an extra day of rest and observation if he or she has any of the following symptoms:

    • Very stuffy or runny nose and/or cough
    • Mild sore throat (no fever, no known exposure to strep)
    • Headache
    • Mild stomachache

    Definitely keep your child at home for treatment and observation if he or she has any of these symptoms:

    • Fever (greater than 100 degrees by mouth and your child may return to school only after is or her temperature has been consistently below 100 degrees, by mouth, for a minimum of 24 hours)
    • Vomiting (even once)
    • Diarrhea
    • Chills
    • General malaise or feelings of fatigue, discomfort, weakness or muscle aches
    • Frequent congested (wet) or croupy cough
    • Lots of nasal congestion with frequent blowing of nose

    To help prevent the flu and other colds, teach your children good hygiene habits:

    • Wash hands frequently
    • Do not touch eyes, nose or mouth
    • Cover mouth and nose when sneezing or coughing, use a paper tissue, throw it away and then wash hands
    • Avoid close contact with people who are sick

    Colds are the most contagious during the first 48 hours. A child who has a fever should remain at home until “fever free” for a minimum of 24 hours without medication. A child who has started antibiotics needs to be on the medication for 48 hours before considered non-contagious and able to return to school.

    Often when a child awakes with vague complaints (the way colds and flu begin) it is wise to observe your child at home for an hour or two before deciding whether or not to bring to school. Your child should be physically able to participate in all school activities on return to school.  Keeping a sick child at home will minimize the spread of infections and viruses in the classroom.

    Thank you in advance for your help to make your school as healthy as possible. 

    If you have any questions, please contact your school nurse.